Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

The drug education in the entire UK received a total turn around ten years back when the police Swat team ran into a rural kitchen somewhere in the UK. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Parody videos on YouTube have not been able to disrespect Frank either. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

Above the Influence is a campaign that mixes jokes and warning stories that the federal government has been using in the UK for a long time; it also offers positive alternatives to drugs. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


"Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world" was used in one of the early internet ad campaigns.

Balancing the message is not always easy to get right. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs

  • A dedicated website
  • A private phone number, accessible 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility